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Mohamed Attiah press conference May 26 to expose CSIS, RCMP misconduct, demand public exoneration

Barely a week after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Egyptian-born Canadian citizen Mohamed Attiah was questioned by the RCMP, deemed a security risk and fired from his engineering job at Atomic Energy of Canada. Attiah’s only crime was being a muslim whose name sounded like one of the terrorists. The incident received immediate international condemnation.

This Tuesday, May 26th, 2015 at 11:00 AM the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE) will host a press conference with Attiah at the Canadian Parliamentary Press Gallery in Ottawa. Attiah is calling on the government to clear him of all false allegations and close his security file which has been left open to this day.

“The government continues punishing me to avoid taking responsibility for their misconduct,” said Attiah. “Meanwhile I continue to suffer the loss of my family, my health, my career and my reputation.”

By intentionally leaving his security files flagged and questionable, the federal government made Attiah unemployable. The provincial government then added salt to the wounds in family court. Attiah was forced to pay child and spousal support arrears of $140,000 despite being unemployed out of no fault of his own. Additionally he was declared mentally incompetent by the Office of the Public Guardian despite overwhelming evidence by three medical professionals, and suffered alienation from his four children.

“Since this matter has never been resolved, my children still look at me with suspicion as though I might be a monster instead of their father,” said Attiah.

Attiah, who served in the Canadian Reserve Armed Forces, will describe how he faced retaliation in the form of blackmail and intimidation after he commenced legal action against his employer, the RCMP and CSIS.

“The singling out of an innocent Canadian because of their religion is absolutely wrong,” said CAFE Executive Director Justin Trottier. “We are honoured to support Mohamed as he fights to be treated equal to any other citizen. We hope for a speedy resolution so that he and his children can re-build their family.”

Full story at www.justice4attiah.com

*As a Deep River native, I went to school with the two of the Attiah boys. They are just everyday people, and this pain has gone on long enough.